Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Superman #706 - Another 'Grounded' Interlude



This is really starting to border on the ridiculous. But according to the DC Source Blog, Superman #706 will be another 'Grounded' interlude issue by G. Willow Wilson. Here is the link and the post in it's entirety. I do recommend going to the site if just to read the comments:
http://dcu.blog.dccomics.com/2010/11/19/g-willow-wilson-picks-up-superman-706/

Hey, Source readers — got some news to close the week with. Writer G. Willow Wilson will return to SUPERMAN with a new “Grounded” tale in issue #706, illustrated by artist Amilcar Pinna.
Superman’s walk across the country ends up having unexpected – and dangerous – repercussions for Perry White and the staff of The Daily Planet. Can Superman help The Planet overcome its latest hurdle?
SUPERMAN #706 hits stores in December. The previously-announced team will pick up again with #707 in January.

So most likely with the JMS leaving, there was something of an upheaval on the main story. An extra month probably will give Chris Roberson time to get up to speed. And Eddy Barrows has always had a hard time keeping a deadline.

Still, doesn't this further the feeling that 'Grounded' has been a disaster. Between poor characterization and delays, the story has not succeeded. Then JMS jumps ship. And now we get another 'interlude'.

It's like putting an intermission in the middle of a very long but bad movie. How many people would simply leave and wander into another theater? How many people will leave the book?

Wilson wrote the Lois issue which seemed like a misstep. Now we'll get a Perry White issue. Let me guess ...without Superman stories because of his 'walk', the Planet is losing readers and might shut down.



I don't know much about Amilcar Pinna but what I have seen on the web makes his stuff look very nice. The above is a very rough Supergirl sketch I found on his blog: http://amilcar-pinna.blogspot.com/

Still, I ache for the days when I'll read a true Superman book again ... either here or in Action. The last time we had that was back in the Brainiac arc in Action and the Atlas arc in Superman. Now that would be something to give thanks for.

6 comments:

valerie21601 said...

I read most of the comments posted on the dc blog link you posted today Anj. Sadly sooo many posters there agree with HOW BADLY the Superman series is and how DC Comics has lost it with their flagship character.

I feel sad and relieved to know others on other blogs/sites agree with you so totally Anj.

Anonymous said...

This makes me sad. Perhaps this should have been called "Cratered" instead of "Grounded."

Mart said...

Yeah, 'ridiculous' is kind - 'pathetic' is how I'd put it at this point. It's desperate, how The Source writer presented the news as, 'Oh, by the way, kids ...' Just doing his job, I suppose.

But honestly, DC isn't going to convince anyone this is business as usual. They'd actually garner some respect if they put their hands up, admitted Grounded hasn't worked and pulled the plug. Like Superman, move on.

Gene said...

DC should just let Sterling Gates write Superman. Rao knows he's qualified...

Anonymous said...

Another fill-in issue. Why am I not surprised? I feel bad for G. Willow Wilson, who wrote the wonderful and unique series "Air" for Vertigo before it was suddenly cancelled earlier this year. Many of the comments and complaints about her last Lois-centric "Superman" issue are rightfully harsh. But I do not think that it's all her fault. In "Air," she had creative control, her own vision, and 24 issues to tell her own story. Here, she is required to churn out a one-issue (or two-issue, at this point) fill-in for a story that has failed on every level. Batman gets 20 titles a month, but Superman's main title is delayed a whole month and now two fill-in issues. Unacceptable, DC, totally unacceptable. I feel bad for Chris Roberson, who has to pick up the pieces of this mess.

Anonymous said...

I'm inclined to look askance at "celebrity writers" on any big name comic book characters. Said writers tend to have a heavy hand on the mythos and little talent for the intricacies of comic book plotting.
Just sayin'....

John Feer